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Planning Step 1: Lesson Curriculum: What are the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Lesson Standards

Always include a writing standard.

SS.3.H.1.1 Explain key historical events that occurred. In the local community and regions over time.
3.W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

Students Will Be Able To… (Do)

  • Skills from standards including thinking (cognitive verbs).
  • This is not activities.
  • One or more goals should be Higher Order Thinking (Levels of Learning 3 or 4), and/or Reading Comprehension.
  • Sequence these goals in the order in which they should be learned.

Describe primary and secondary sources
Analyze key events using primary sources
Compare and contrast key historical events and their role in our area’s history
Write to explain the importance of primary sources in understanding key historical events

Students Will Know

Knowledge from standards such as vocabulary, facts, formulas.

Primary sources
Secondary sources
Historical events of our region

Lesson Essential Question

  • A question that communicates the Learning Goals.
  • Reflect the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal(s).

Why are primary sources important for understanding the significance of historical events?

Planning Step 3: Lesson Instruction: How will students learn?

Activating Strategy

  • Plan this after you plan your Learning Activities. How will you introduce the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you draw attention to important vocabulary in the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you build/link background knowledge?
  • What prerequisite content might students need to know before the lesson?
  • >Which key vocabulary from the Learning Goals needs to be explicitly taught?
  • Are there other vocabulary words that you think need to be taught?
  • Which vocabulary strategy will you use?
  • Previewing:
    • Advance Organizer
    • Prerequisite Content
    • Vocabulary

Introduce the Lesson Essential Question. Highlight the term primary sources. Splash examples of primary sources around the term.

Numbered Heads: 1’s – what do these types of primary sources have in common? 2’s – why are these types of sources important?

Using a brief power point, show students pictures, clips, and vocabulary from 17th and 18th century NC. Students will create a brief timeline for their notebooks, identifying key points for each event.
Key Vocabulary (for explicit instruction):
garrison, encroaching, emigrate, revolution

Vocabulary Strategy: Vocabulary matrix (word, description, picture or visual cue)

Previewing (what, who, when):

Graphic Organizer

  • How will students store and organize information as they learn during this lesson?
  • Base the organizer on the Higher Order Thinking or Reading Comprehension in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals.
  • Determine how the organizer will be previewed for struggling students.
  • Determine how the organizer will be scaffolded for struggling students.

Comparison Graphic Organizer

Previewing (what, who, when):
Preview the Anchor Chart and steps for completing the Comparison Graphic Organizer. Students practice comparing and contrasting familiar content to complete a comparison graphic organizer (ex. fairy tales, movies, famous TV characters, previously read storybooks, etc).

Scaffolding (what, who, when):

Learning Activity 1

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Using an interactive lecture, present students with information about primary and secondary sources. (Definitions, characteristics, examples, non-examples, importance). Students will record the information in their interactive notebook.

Collaborative Pairs: Students will then work in pairs to classify scenarios as either primary or secondary sources.

Pairs Square: Students will check their answers by creating a group of four.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Strategically pair students to be able to determine type of sources.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 1

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

3-5-3 Poem: Students will summarize how to recognize a primary source.

3 examples
5-word description
3 characteristics

Learning Activity 2

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Students will work in pairs to choose three historical events from the timeline they created in the Activating Strategy. Students will learn about the three events by examining primary sources (ex. diary entries, engravings, speeches, art objects, or pieces of creative writing, etc).

For each primary source, answer the following questions:
What is the source information (date, author, format)?
What do you see (record facts, observations, evidence)?
What do you think is important about the source?

Think-Pair-Share: Tell your partner two interesting facts you’ve learned about each event and why you found it interesting.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 2

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Headline Summary: Write a headline summary to represent the importance of three historical events.

Learning Activity 3

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Review the Compare and Contrast anchor chart. Explain the steps for comparing and why each is important for correctly using the comparison graphic organizer.

After describing key events using primary sources, the teacher will think aloud about one or two types of criteria that can be used to compare events. Students will work with a partner to brainstorm two or three additional criteria for comparing events. Using the criteria, collaborative pairs will choose two events to compare and contrast by completing the comparison organizer.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Provide paragraph numbers for specific key events to help students locate important key details.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 3

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

30 Second Radio Spot – students write a script that compares the most important similarities and differences of the two events. Students may perform the spot in small groups or in front of the entire class.

Planning Step 2: Lesson Assessment: How will students demonstrate understanding of the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Assignment

  • Plan this before planning Lesson Instruction.
  • How will students demonstrate their knowledge of the Will Know Learning Goals and the skills in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals (especially the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension)?
  • How will the Assignment be differentiated for support and challenge?
  • Which students receive differentiation?
  • For students who struggle with the Assignment, how will you remediate this lesson?

Students will use the graphic organizer to write an essay that explains why primary sources are important when analyzing historical events. Use evidence from each primary source to support your reasons.

Differentiated Assignment for Struggling Students:
Provide struggling students with two reasons why primary sources are important for analyzing historical events. Students will find evidence to support the reasons.

Differentiated Assignment for More Challenge:
Students include one reason why primary sources may not be completely accurate, but are still beneficial.

Remediation:
Card Sort: Students work in small groups to separate primary and secondary sources about a historical event. Students will then use the sorted primary sources to analyze the historical event using the analysis questions. Students will use Written Conversations to explore reasons why the primary sources are important for understanding the historical event.

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