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Planning Step 1: Lesson Curriculum: What are the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Lesson Standards

Always include a writing standard.

3.RL.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

3.W.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.

3.S&L.5 Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details

Students Will Be Able To… (Do)

  • Skills from standards including thinking (cognitive verbs).
  • This is not activities.
  • One or more goals should be Higher Order Thinking (Levels of Learning 3 or 4), and/or Reading Comprehension.
  • Sequence these goals in the order in which they should be learned.

Identify feelings of the main character(s) in a story
Describe traits of the main character(s) in a story
Analyze motivations of the main character(s) in a story and their relationship to the character’s traits and feelings
Evaluate how a character’s actions contribute to the sequence of events

Students Will Know

Knowledge from standards such as vocabulary, facts, formulas.

Feelings
Traits
Motivations
Feelings and traits relate to the motivations of a character
Character actions contribute to the sequence of events

Lesson Essential Question

  • A question that communicates the Learning Goals.
  • Reflect the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal(s).

How does the main character contribute to what happens in the story?

Planning Step 3: Lesson Instruction: How will students learn?

Activating Strategy

  • Plan this after you plan your Learning Activities. How will you introduce the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you draw attention to important vocabulary in the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you build/link background knowledge?
  • What prerequisite content might students need to know before the lesson?
  • >Which key vocabulary from the Learning Goals needs to be explicitly taught?
  • Are there other vocabulary words that you think need to be taught?
  • Which vocabulary strategy will you use?
  • Previewing:
    • Advance Organizer
    • Prerequisite Content
    • Vocabulary

Choose a well-known popular character from stories (can be a class book read, from a series the students know, etc). Write small papers each with words describing the character’s traits including physical traits. Include references to emotions experiences by the character. Put all the clues into a bag.
Have the students reach into the bag one at a time and share a clue. Students are to see if they can determine who the character is by the time the clues are all shared. Have the students guess who they think the character is; confirm right and wrong answers. Explain to the students that knowing things about the character’s feelings, traits and motivations helps you understand the character and how he/she affects the story.
Give each child sticky notes and have the class brainstorm words to describe different characters that they know. Put all of the words on chart paper to sort during the activities.
Key Vocabulary (for explicit instruction):
Feelings, traits, motivations

Vocabulary Strategy:
Word mapping

Graphic Organizer

  • How will students store and organize information as they learn during this lesson?
  • Base the organizer on the Higher Order Thinking or Reading Comprehension in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals.
  • Determine how the organizer will be previewed for struggling students.
  • Determine how the organizer will be scaffolded for struggling students.

Character Graphic Organizer

Learning Activity 1

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Explain to students that they are going to look closely at the main character in a story and use what the character looks like, says, feels and does to learn about the character. Use the anchor chart frame and focus on the emotions/feelings side.
Look at the words brainstormed during the activating strategy. Model the thought process to determine if the word describes a feeling and add it to the anchor chart.
Explain that a character’s feelings concern a specific time or event.
Read the story, Thank You Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco asking students to pay attention to the feelings that the main character experiences

Reread certain paragraphs that pertain to emotion. Model the first to show how the feeling of the character is shared.

Partners tell each other what other feelings are experienced.

On the graphic organizer, make a list of feeling words that the main character (the girl) experienced.

Previewing: determining the main character in a story (using a class read aloud, spend time examining the main character–who it is, how did we determine that, what role does the main character play in the story). Create a chart listing how the character felt, acted, and what was learned from that.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 1

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Quick write: the students will write about how they felt about learning to read compared to how the girl felt

Scaffolding: students will write about how the main character felt about reading at the beginning of the story

Learning Activity 2

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Remind students that previously they had discussed feelings/emotions that the character had experienced in the book Thank You, Mr. Falker. Explain that they are now going to look at the traits of the character. Use the anchor charts to review what character traits include and how we can categorize them as inside and outside traits.
Refer back to the anchor chart from the previous day. Using the remaining words from the activating strategy, add words to the other side as trait examples.

Send the students to their computers (or watch whole class) the video of Thank You, Mr. Falker being read:

Upon completion of the video, have students complete the physical description of the girl (outside traits) on their graphic organizer. Remind students that this is what they see when they look at the character or the physical description words that the author shares.

Back in the whole group, go around the group and have students share something they put on their list, checking off if someone says what they have. Include what is shared on the model graphic organizer.

Now share turn the focus to the inside traits. Have partners talk about what inside traits they think the character had using the anchor charts to guide discussion.

Back in the group, have partners share. Record the list of traits. Model taking a trait and locating evidence in the story that it is indeed a trait of the main character.

Have partners record in their graphic organizer. Take another word suggested by partners and model finding the evidence. Have the students continue to work either with partners or on their own to find two more traits (can use the brainstormed list) with evidence. Teacher will monitor groups to make sure that they are understanding the support component.

Students come back and share out with others. Teacher models again the difference between the feelings and the traits of the character referring to the anchor chart.

Using the word cards provided, partners will sort the words into feeling words and character traits.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 2

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Pairs square: Partners will compare their sorts with that of another partner group and discuss any words that are not agreed on.
Partners will discuss the following: Now that you have sorted your words, what else might belong in each group? What is the relationship between the two groups?

Learning Activity 3

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Have partners share a time that they made a mistake and got in trouble. Ask them to focus on what the parent/teacher/adult said to them regarding their choice. Have them also reflect on what made them make the choice they did.

Tie the student experience to that of a character in a book. Share the anchor chart and review the word motivation from the word map. Explain what character motivation is in a story.

Refer back to Thank You, Mr. Falker. Discuss the motivation of the main character. Record on the graphic organizer concerning her motivation, tying it back to her feelings and traits.

Partners discuss the girl, but also give them a chance to talk about Mr. Falker and his motivation in the story.

Have students read The True Story of the Three Little Pigs.
Students will work in pairs to complete a graphic organizer (each having their own copy) of the wolf in the story (the same graphic organizer they completed for Thank You, Mr. Falker). Teacher will monitor and prompt with questions to make sure all information is considered and included.

Scaffolding: give different students leveled stories that have a distinct villain or main character with clear motivations

Using the completed graphic organizer, individual students will create a wanted advertisement for the wolf that will include the physical characteristics and a narrative summary explaining his traits and motivations (or that of another character if a different book it used). This activity will be graded with a rubric given to the students. Use educreations website to read the advertisement and create illustrations to go with it–this part may be done in the original partner group.

Have a class gallery walk to see finished products.

Previewing: use Educreations to make another product prior to this lesson

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 3

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

On a card:
Front:
3-2-1 For the main character in the story, write about
3 traits the character has
2 feelings the character experiences
1 motivation (reason why the character did what he/she did)

Back: How do the traits and feelings relate to the motivation?

Scaffolding: students may write about Mr. Falker, the wolf or the girl in the story

Learning Activity 4

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Refer back to the anchor charts used to discuss the main character in the story Thank You, Mr. Falker and The True Story of the Three Little Pigs.

Explain how a character’s actions contribute to the sequence of events.

In pairs, students go around the room for a carousel activity. At each stop on the carousel, there is a question related to one of the two stories. Some are specific questions related to the cause/effect relationship created by the character’s motivations. Others are what if questions pertaining to how the story would be different if the character wanted something else or acted in a different manner. Students will rotate and discuss answers.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 4

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

At the conclusion, put the students in groups and give each group one of the questions that was posted on the wall for the carousel. Each group is to form a written response to share with the class. Give each person in the group a job (facilitator, recorder, presenters) to provide accountability for participation and engagement..

Share out and discuss the responses and how the character actions contributes to the stories.

Planning Step 2: Lesson Assessment: How will students demonstrate understanding of the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Assignment

  • Plan this before planning Lesson Instruction.
  • How will students demonstrate their knowledge of the Will Know Learning Goals and the skills in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals (especially the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension)?
  • How will the Assignment be differentiated for support and challenge?
  • Which students receive differentiation?
  • For students who struggle with the Assignment, how will you remediate this lesson?

Read the selected passage you have been given. Using your completed graphic organizer as a guide,complete another graphic organizer on the main character in your story. Then,
based on what you analyzed about the character in your graphic organizer, infer three actions that you think the character will do next in the story and explain why the character will act that way.

Scaffolding: Passages will be leveled

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