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Planning Step 1: Lesson Curriculum: What are the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Lesson Standards

Always include a writing standard.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.5
Analyze how a particular sentence chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.1.B
Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.

Students Will Be Able To… (Do)

  • Skills from standards including thinking (cognitive verbs).
  • This is not activities.
  • One or more goals should be Higher Order Thinking (Levels of Learning 3 or 4), and/or Reading Comprehension.
  • Sequence these goals in the order in which they should be learned.

Describe how a particular story’s plot unfolds in a series of events
Analyze how the structure of the text (plot of the novel) relies on the story elements (setting)
Construct support for a claim citing evidence from the text

Students Will Know

Knowledge from standards such as vocabulary, facts, formulas.

Elements of a Fictional Text (setting)
Historical fiction is influenced by eras, events, and figures from history.

Lesson Essential Question

  • A question that communicates the Learning Goals.
  • Reflect the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal(s).

How does setting affect the development of the story’s plot?

Planning Step 3: Lesson Instruction: How will students learn?

Activating Strategy

  • Plan this after you plan your Learning Activities. How will you introduce the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you draw attention to important vocabulary in the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you build/link background knowledge?
  • What prerequisite content might students need to know before the lesson?
  • >Which key vocabulary from the Learning Goals needs to be explicitly taught?
  • Are there other vocabulary words that you think need to be taught?
  • Which vocabulary strategy will you use?
  • Previewing:
    • Advance Organizer
    • Prerequisite Content
    • Vocabulary

Introduce the essential question with a focus on the highlighted terms. – How does the setting affect the development of the story’s plot?

Teacher Read Aloud
Pink and Say by Patricia Polacco

This book is set during the Civil War. This story is about how a young black soldier rescues a white soldier.

Review the book using the EQ. How does the setting contribute to or affect the development of the story’s plot?

Key Vocabulary (for explicit instruction):
development (within the context of setting and plot), historical fiction, contribute

Vocabulary Strategy:
Word map

Previewing (what, who, when):
In small group work with students who have been identified with possible barriers to understanding. As this standard and lessons that are used in instruction are closely tied to historical fiction students may need additional instruction on the correlation between a setting based on an era and its influence on the plot of a story.

Provide the students with direct instruction about what historical fiction with the accompanying word map and provide a number of examples. As a preview activating strategy; read scenarios that are set in the past. How did the setting contribute to the development of the story? Complete a modified graphic organizer when discussing the scenarios.

What is the setting of the story?
What event is a result of this setting?
What effects does this have on the development of the story’s plot?
How can we support this with details from the story?

Graphic Organizer

  • How will students store and organize information as they learn during this lesson?
  • Base the organizer on the Higher Order Thinking or Reading Comprehension in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals.
  • Determine how the organizer will be previewed for struggling students.
  • Determine how the organizer will be scaffolded for struggling students.

Use a cause and effect organizer but with slight changes to the titles
Causes – Are the elements of the setting
Event – What happened in the story
Effect – How did it effect the events of the story and characters

Previewing (what, who, when):
Provide students with different scenarios from literature that were influenced by setting. (As explained in the activating strategy preview)

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Modify the graphic organizer to include partially filled in details for the story.

Learning Activity 1

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

The Passage to Freedom by Ken Mochizuki

This historical fiction book is based on the real life story of a Japanese diplomat living in Lithuania prior to World War 2. He helps Jewish refugees escape Europe from Nazi persecution at the expense of disobeying his government.

Teacher will share the cause and effect graphic organizer and anchor chart.

1s tell 2s – How does the setting influence the events of a story?

Review the book and complete the graphic organizer.

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Partially filled in graphic organizer with detail from the story.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 1

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Paired Response Cards
Students are given a question or prompt and respond on an index card, piece of paper or whiteboard. At the teacher’s signal, they hold up the response. Since partners share a response card, they must confer and reach agreement on an answer and be able to support their reasoning.

How does the setting of Nazi Germany create story events that are unique to other types of historical fiction?

Learning Activity 2

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

The teacher introduces the classroom novel and a brief synopsis of the book.

Title: The Boy Who Dared
Author: Susan Campbell Bartoletti
Genre: Historical Fiction
Lexile: 760

Summary: In October, 1942, seventeen-year-old Helmuth Hubener, imprisoned for distributing anti-Nazi leaflets, recalls his past life and how he came to dedicate himself to bring the truth about Hitler and the war to the German people. In the newly formed Third Reich, Hitler’s initial political doctrine is filled with hopeful solutions for a country plagued with unemployment, poverty, and a post-World War I feeling of defeat. Propaganda and promises quickly turn to oppressive new laws including the required participation in the Hitler Youth. Helmuth Hübener enters the program and is at once impressed with the bravado, shiny uniforms, boots, and patriotic fever sweeping the country. But his Mormon-based teachings trigger questions in his mind about the reality behind the regime’s invasions of neighboring countries, mistreatment of Jewish citizens, and closely controlled media. He creates an underground newsletter with information gathered from BBC reports using an illegal shortwave radio. As he secretly distributes the flyers throughout the town, his boldness encourages him to gather several accomplices resulting in his arrest, trial, and execution. The novel opens as he is on death row, and the story is told as a series of flashbacks. Helmuth is portrayed as a brave, outspoken voice amid a family of acquiescing brothers, mother, and new SS stepfather. Based on a real person, the novel includes black-and-white photos of Hübener and his family.

Introduce the novel and historical background. The setting (where and when) directly affects characters and events, especially in historical fiction. Review the graphic organizer (cause and effect) along with an anchor chart that students will utilize in organizing the effects of the setting on the events and characters of the story.

Read chapter 1 of the novel. As a group fill discuss and fill in the initial influence of the setting on the novel’s events.

Previewing (what, who, when):
Discuss the synopsis of the book to be read. Discuss the possible implications of the setting on the plot. Clear up any misconceptions of the era that is the basis for the setting

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Fill in the graphic organizer with partial details from the text, page numbers or questions that could aid the student in completing the information.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 2

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

R.A.F.T.
Write a Book Review and Synopsis for a magazine
R – the book critic
A – magazine readers
F – Magazine book review including a synopsis of the plot (don’t forget to rate the book 1-5 stars)
T – The Boy Who Dared
Shouldn’t you have something that directly prompts them to think about the plot—to match the goal? – What if one of the requirements was a synopsis of the book, or of what they had read at that point. They would be able to use their GO.

Learning Activity 3

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Review the cause and effect graphic organizer and anchor chart. Students will continue to read the novel (chapter ____) , The Boy Who Dared, in organized groups. The teacher will monitor progress with the graphic organizer and group observation.

1s and 2s – Think, Pair, Shares will also be used to spot check progress.

1s tell 2s What was one effect that was added to your organizer during this reading session?

Previewing (what, who, when):
Review with students the first chapter of The Boy who Dared? How was the graphic organizer completed? What text evidence was used to support your rationale for completing the cause and effect organizer?

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Fill in the graphic organizer with partial details from the text, page numbers or questions that could aid the student in completing the information.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 3

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Create a Google Map
Include important setting locations from the novel. Cite the text to explain how they relate to the story of Helmuth.

The google map allows text to be inserted. Students will add a written commentary to the map explaining the importance of the location and how the setting shaped the events of the novel. They should cite specific text evidence from the novel using their graphic organizer as an aid.

Planning Step 2: Lesson Assessment: How will students demonstrate understanding of the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Assignment

  • Plan this before planning Lesson Instruction.
  • How will students demonstrate their knowledge of the Will Know Learning Goals and the skills in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals (especially the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension)?
  • How will the Assignment be differentiated for support and challenge?
  • Which students receive differentiation?
  • For students who struggle with the Assignment, how will you remediate this lesson?

Double Journal Entry
The novel was inspired by the real life of a young German teen. Helmuth was imprisoned and later put to death. These events were directly related to the setting of the time period, Germany during Nazi occupation. Analyze the relationship between the setting and the development the story.

How might Helmuth’s story have developed differently in a different time and place. Write 2 journal entries. One from the perspective of Helmuth in the novel supported by text evidence. The second journal entry will be a journal entry as if the story was set in a different time and place.

Differentiated Assignment for Struggling Students:

Provide students with a template that outlines the specific requirements of the writing assignment.

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