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Planning Step 1: Lesson Curriculum: What are the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Lesson Standards

Always include a writing standard.

RL.5.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, recognizing specific word choices that contribute to meaning and tone.
W.5.2 Write informative /explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
c. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples

Students Will Be Able To… (Do)

  • Skills from standards including thinking (cognitive verbs).
  • This is not activities.
  • One or more goals should be Higher Order Thinking (Levels of Learning 3 or 4), and/or Reading Comprehension.
  • Sequence these goals in the order in which they should be learned.

Use context clues to help determine the meaning of unknown figurative language
Analyze similes and metaphors impact on tone
Evaluate the impact of the author’s use of figurative language on the tone of a text

Students Will Know

Knowledge from standards such as vocabulary, facts, formulas.

Words chosen by the author and the use of specific figurative language will affect the meaning of the text.
Understand that words and phrases have often have literal and figurative meanings
Know that similes and metaphors are words used to compare two objects

Lesson Essential Question

  • A question that communicates the Learning Goals.
  • Reflect the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal(s).

How does author’s specific word choice contribute to meaning and tone?

Planning Step 3: Lesson Instruction: How will students learn?

Activating Strategy

  • Plan this after you plan your Learning Activities. How will you introduce the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you draw attention to important vocabulary in the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you build/link background knowledge?
  • What prerequisite content might students need to know before the lesson?
  • >Which key vocabulary from the Learning Goals needs to be explicitly taught?
  • Are there other vocabulary words that you think need to be taught?
  • Which vocabulary strategy will you use?
  • Previewing:
    • Advance Organizer
    • Prerequisite Content
    • Vocabulary

5-3-1 (alone, pair, group) Pose a question/topic related to the essential question (figurative language) of the upcoming lesson. Then have students to individually brainstorm 5 answers. Then they work in a pair to come up with the 3 best. Then the pair joins with another pair to come up with the 1 most important.

Key Vocabulary (for explicit instruction):
phases, figurative meaning, connotative meaning, literal meaning, word choice, impression, detail, tone, imagery

Vocabulary Strategy: Do I Know What These Words Mean

Previewing (what, who, when):
Frayer Model – Is there a particular word you can preview using the Frayer? Maybe imagery?

Graphic Organizer

  • How will students store and organize information as they learn during this lesson?
  • Base the organizer on the Higher Order Thinking or Reading Comprehension in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals.
  • Determine how the organizer will be previewed for struggling students.
  • Determine how the organizer will be scaffolded for struggling students.

Evaluate Chart

Learning Activity 1

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Music is packed with figurative language. Play Firework by Katy Perry. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1lfYh-aUk0

Tell the students that this song is one of your favorite songs.Tell students why this is your favorite song. Ask scholars what is their favorite school appropriate song. Have scholars explain why this is their favorite song.(Scholars should talk about the artist, the melody/beat, and the message. Prompting may be necessary). Display Fireworks lyrics on the board.

Discuss the figurative language in the song. Underline examples of figurative language in the song. Tell scholars that lyrics are poems. Explain that figurative language helps to create imagery for the audience. Imagery is key for creating tone and mood. Students will add descriptions and examples for each of the following words on the Do I Know… organizer: Figurative Language, Imagery, Mood, Tone

Four Corners Activity
Popular songs to use in the activity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z03pREr8epg
Students go to a corner to work in small groups to 1) listen to a song, 2) read the lyrics of the song, 3) go through each line identifying and charting imagery and figurative language, 4) Create an explanation of the how the figurative language helped create tone and mood in the song. Create a visual poster to share ideas with class.

Previewing (what, who, when):
Provide students with a few well known idioms.
It’s raining cats and dogs.
A drop in the bucket.
A picture is worth a thousand words.

Ask: What is the imagery conveyed by the idiom? Is this something that really happens? Why would someone say this? Tell scholars that idioms are one type of figurative language. Figurative language helps create imagery and meaning. Tell scholars that sometimes you have to use context clues to determine the meaning of figurative language. This is an important skill and one that will be learned in an upcoming lesson.

Scaffolding (what, who, when):

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 1

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Letter to an Absent Student: Explain to an absent student that words and word phrases have figurative or literal meanings. Explain how context clues can help you to understand unknown figurative language.

Learning Activity 2

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Show students the video Similes and Metaphors from Bazillion. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoSBVNUO2LU

Students will work with a partner to do a closed card sort of example similes and metaphors.

Explain that similes and metaphors are specific types of figurative language, and that figurative language has a powerful impact on mood and tone.

Using the video and lyrics from the Frozen song, Let it Go, Students will work with a team to identify the figurative language. Students will analyze the song’s use of similes and metaphors and their impact on tone. They will add their thinking to the Figurative Language in My Own Words chart.

Think-Ink-Share: What is the tone of the song? Write your ideas and support your thinking with at least 2 examples. Share your answer with a partner. Share out whole group.

Students will create a song using similes and metaphors identified on their figurative language chart

Idina Menzel
The snow glows white on the mountain tonight
Not a footprint to be seen
A kingdom of isolation
And it looks l the queen
The wind is howling like this swirling storm inside
Couldn’t keep it in, heaven knows I’ve tried
Don’t let them in, don’t let them see
Be the good girl you always have to be
Conceal, don’t feel, don’t let them know
Well, now they know
Let it go, let it go
Can’t hold it back anymore
Let it go, let it go
Turn away and slam the door
I don’t care what they’re going to say
Let the storm rage on
The cold never bothered me anyway
Let it go, let it go
Can’t hold it back anymore
Let it go, let it go
Turn away and slam the door
Let it go (go, go, go go, go go, go go, go, go, go go)
Let it go
Let it go
Let it go
It’s funny…

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 2

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Using the song from their Four Corner group, students will reread the lyrics and identify similes and metaphors. They will analyze what each means and add it to the Figurative Language in My Own Words chart. Students will compare their analysis with a new partner (someone from the same Four Corner group).

Quick Write: Write to explain how the song uses similes and metaphors to impact tone. Provide at least 2 examples to support your answer.

Learning Activity 3

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Lesson on Tone:
-The teacher will ask the class, “Have you ever had your mom or teacher say to you, “don’t use that tone of voice with me!”? What did they mean by that? -The teacher will explain tone using an interactive video clip and lecture.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jg1i8UyCxRY

The teacher will introduce the Evaluate Anchor Chart. The teacher will model for students how to use the evaluate graphic organizer using Let It Go to apply criteria to understand its impact on tone in the song. Criteria: Imagery, Diction (word choice) and Figurative Language (similes, metaphors)

Students will work with their shoulder partners to evaluate the tone and its impact on a song (one from Four Corners activity, but may not be the same one used before). They will add their evidence and conclusion to the graphic organizer. They will create two statements to share during the Fishbowl Discussion and one question that they have about one the application of one of the criteria. Teacher models questions with Let It Go.

Examples:
The word choice of the title, Let It Go, is important because Elsa is letting go of hiding her secret. But is she also letting go of something else?
Why would the author use the metaphor “Kingdom of isolation” – there are people in a kingdom?

Fishbowl Discussion: Students will evaluate each other as groups come together to debate the tone and its impact on the song.

Previewing (what, who, when):
The matrix graphic organizer on tone and diction. Students will finish filling in the example with the sentence on heat this time working with the teacher to determine the author’s tone based on the words he/she uses in that sentence.

Scaffolding (what, who, when): Partial fill in of the graphic organizer on tone.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 3

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Using their graphic organizer, students will write an acrostic poem using the word TONE to explain how figurative language, imagery and diction impact it. Students may use words or word phrases that start with each letter of the word TONE.

T – Clues help target the author’s feelings toward something
O – Organize clues into criteria
N – Need evidence
E – Evaluate tone by understanding the meaning of the figurative language and diction used in the text

Planning Step 2: Lesson Assessment: How will students demonstrate understanding of the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Assignment

  • Plan this before planning Lesson Instruction.
  • How will students demonstrate their knowledge of the Will Know Learning Goals and the skills in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals (especially the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension)?
  • How will the Assignment be differentiated for support and challenge?
  • Which students receive differentiation?
  • For students who struggle with the Assignment, how will you remediate this lesson?

1. Create and illustrate a Superhero. Use figurative language to describe their Superhero. For example, they may write “Arms as big as a Volkswagen Beetle (H)”, and draw a line to their heroes muscles. They should include at least 6 examples of figurative language in their labels, and each type must be used at least once (metaphor, simile, alliteration, personification, onomatopoeia, hyperbole).

2. On the other side of their paper, they will write 2 paragraphs and a jingle. Paragraph one is the character’s story. (Where did he/she come from? How did he/she get these powers? What motivates him/her to do the things he/she does? Does she/ he have a secret identity? What is it? Does he/she have any weaknesses? Use at least 3 examples of figurative language here while indicating which type of figurative language it was.) Paragraph two is about their character’s characteristics. (What powers does he/she have? How do they use them? Why do they save (or hurt) people? Use at least 3 examples of figurative language here while indicating which type of figurative language it was.)
Their last activity is to write a small jingle (between 4-6 lines) that would be sung at the beginning of a cartoon about their hero (using figurative language techniques). make sure the tune of the jingle will reflect the correct Positive and Negative Connotations
[Think of the Spiderman tune, now think of the jingle that will go with the Joker.] You can put your jingle to the tune of a real song. Use and label at least 4 examples of figurative language here.

Differentiated Assignment for Struggling Students:

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