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Planning Step 1: Lesson Curriculum: What are the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Lesson Standards

Always include a writing standard.

RL11.3: Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)
RL 11.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.

W 11.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Students Will Be Able To… (Do)

  • Skills from standards including thinking (cognitive verbs).
  • This is not activities.
  • One or more goals should be Higher Order Thinking (Levels of Learning 3 or 4), and/or Reading Comprehension.
  • Sequence these goals in the order in which they should be learned.

*Determine how story elements develop and impact the poem
*Analyze how specific word choices impact meaning and tone
*Analyze viewpoints of different characters (narrator and raven in the poem)
*Evaluate the impact of different viewpoints on a poem or story

Students Will Know

Knowledge from standards such as vocabulary, facts, formulas.

*story elements
*tone – how tone impacts a poem or story

Lesson Essential Question

  • A question that communicates the Learning Goals.
  • Reflect the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal(s).

How would a poem or story be different if it was told from another viewpoint?

Planning Step 3: Lesson Instruction: How will students learn?

Activating Strategy

  • Plan this after you plan your Learning Activities. How will you introduce the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you draw attention to important vocabulary in the Lesson Essential Question?
  • How will you build/link background knowledge?
  • What prerequisite content might students need to know before the lesson?
  • >Which key vocabulary from the Learning Goals needs to be explicitly taught?
  • Are there other vocabulary words that you think need to be taught?
  • Which vocabulary strategy will you use?
  • Previewing:
    • Advance Organizer
    • Prerequisite Content
    • Vocabulary

Present the Advanced Organizer which defines Romanticism and gives examples of stories we will study under the unit. Ask students if they know of any current day stories/movies that meet the criteria of Romanticism and explain.
Key Vocabulary (for explicit instruction):

Vocab to explicitly teach: Romanticism

Vocabulary Strategy: Word Map

Advanced Organizer: is presented as the Activating Strategy. It defines Romanticism and gives examples of stories we will study under the unit.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Preview advanced organizer: Romanticism Characteristics, what it is like, what it is not like

Graphic Organizer

  • How will students store and organize information as they learn during this lesson?
  • Base the organizer on the Higher Order Thinking or Reading Comprehension in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals.
  • Determine how the organizer will be previewed for struggling students.
  • Determine how the organizer will be scaffolded for struggling students.

LA1

For LA 2 Complete a T Chart with two columns: word choice and tone. (and other side for LA 4)

Previewing (what, who, when):

How to complete a T Chart: Students create a T Chart of sound devices and examples found in the Poem, Travel.

Scaffolding (what, who, when):

Give students line numbers to assist in finding examples

Learning Activity 1

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Students will read along while they listen to a reading of The Raven by Christopher Walken.

After reading “The Raven” determine the story elements that the author used. Complete the graphic organizer by identifying the element, listing the example from the text, and explaining the impact that element had on the poem.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):

List the story elements.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 1

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Jigsaw: What prediction can you make about what would happen if ____________ changes? 1’s: Characterization/characters, 2’s: setting, 3’s: plot, 4’s: conflict

Learning Activity 2

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

“Tone: What the Experts Say” info sheet. I read aloud what each expert says about how tone impacts text. We will examine how tone has impacted poem, The Raven.

Students work in groups of 4 to analyze specific sections of the poem. 1’s: 1-24, 2’s 25-54, 3’s: 55-78, 4’s: 79-105

Complete the T Chart with two columns: word choice and tone. Students pick out words and phrases for the word choice side and then identify/explain the tone on the other side. (The goal is for students to examine the author’s choice of words and choose some that develop the overall tone of The Raven.)

Each member shares their words and the established tone.

Together students create a 3 minute Graffitti Wall that reflects the tone of the poem.

Previewing (what, who, when):

T Chart has been previewed.

Scaffolding (what, who, when):

Students have a photocopy of assigned section and are instructed to use close reading skills, annotate and highlight the text, to assist with reading for the specific purpose of examining the author’s choice of words.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 2

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Use the graffiti wall to brainstorm a response to an expert of your choice about how tone has impacted the poem. Write the response. (I will compile student responses and create a similar info sheet titled “Tone: What the Students Say” to hang on the wall next to “Tone: What the Experts Say”.

Learning Activity 3

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Writing a different viewpoint:

What would the raven say? Suppose that the raven in the poem, instead of only saying, “Nevermore,” has an extensive human vocabulary. How would the raven explain his actions? What reason would he give for entering the speaker’s house and for repeating, “Nevermore”? What would he say about who he is?

First, discuss your ideas with your shoulder partner.
Second, use words that reflect a particular tone of your choice.
Third, try to write in the style of the poem.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Meet with students who will struggle with writing or will struggle with selecting a tone. Brainstorm a list of words and phrases that will convey the tone.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 3

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Which is better? Switch papers with a writing partner. Using a completed graphic organizer (matrix) and providing similarities and differences, write a summary answering which is better, Poe’s Version or my partner’s comparing/contrasting the two texts and evaluating the tone used by both authors.

Learning Activity 4

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

  • Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
  • Content students need to learn
  • Chunk activity:
    • Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
    • Distributed summarizing and/or practice
    • Questions to ask
    • Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
  • Active engagement:
    • Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
    • Variety
    • Movement
  • Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
  • Scaffolding content and process

Walk about activity: Students take their raven created viewpoint and the T chart and walk about the room while music plays. When the music stops they will partner up with someone close by. Students exchange papers and complete the Word Choice, Tone T chart (on the back of the one used in Learning Activity 2 by analyzing the word choice used.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 4

  • Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
  • Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
  • Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Students answer the question at the bottom of the T Chart: How has the tone impacted the text? (My goal is to have students understand that a change in viewpoint could result in a change of tone).

Planning Step 2: Lesson Assessment: How will students demonstrate understanding of the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Assignment

  • Plan this before planning Lesson Instruction.
  • How will students demonstrate their knowledge of the Will Know Learning Goals and the skills in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals (especially the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension)?
  • How will the Assignment be differentiated for support and challenge?
  • Which students receive differentiation?
  • For students who struggle with the Assignment, how will you remediate this lesson?

How would a poem or story be different if it was told from another viewpoint? (I am looking for how a shift in point of view will effect story elements, language, and tone)

Students choose how to show their learning. Students can create a newspaper article, interview the author, interview characters, write an essay, create a prezi or ppt, create a skit, sing a song, use interpretive dance. (or create their own way of showing learning)

Differentiated Assignment for Struggling Students:

Assist students with choosing a way to display their learning by brainstorming ideas that match their strengths. Offer extra credit to also show learning in a style they struggle with (ex: writing, speaking).

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