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Planning Step 1: Lesson Curriculum: What are the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Lesson Standards

Always include a writing standard.

SOL 6.5g: Explain how character and plot development are used in a selection to support a central conflict or story line.

SOL 6.7 The student will write narration, description, exposition, and persuasion.

Students Will Be Able To… (Do)

Skills from standards including thinking (cognitive verbs).
This is not activities.
One or more goals should be Higher Order Thinking (Levels of Learning 3 or 4), and/or Reading Comprehension.
Sequence these goals in the order in which they should be learned.

Explain how a character’s trait(s) affects what happens in a story
Analyze the characters’ effects on the plot and its resolution
Compare two strong characters’ traits and how they affect the plot and resolution

Students Will Know

Knowledge from standards such as vocabulary, facts, formulas.

Character traits are revealed by:
what a character says
what a character thinks
what a character does
how other characters respond to the character
Character’s traits effects on the plot and its resolution

Lesson Essential Question

A question that communicates the Learning Goals.
Reflect the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal(s).

How do good readers analyze characters and the way they affect plot?

Planning Step 3: Lesson Instruction: How will students learn?

Activating Strategy

Plan this after you plan your Learning Activities. How will you introduce the Lesson Essential Question?
How will you draw attention to important vocabulary in the Lesson Essential Question?
How will you build/link background knowledge?
What prerequisite content might students need to know before the lesson?
>Which key vocabulary from the Learning Goals needs to be explicitly taught?
Are there other vocabulary words that you think need to be taught?
Which vocabulary strategy will you use?
Previewing:

Advance Organizer
Prerequisite Content
Vocabulary

Introduce the lesson’s essential question. Read a short version of “The Three Little Pigs.” Using a graphic organizer, labeled, “Characters: Pig 1, Pig 2, Pig 3, The Wolf” prompt students to share how the characters are the same and how they are different. Next to each character, have students list the appropriate character traits. Prompt students to identify the conflict in the story and examine how the traits of the characters affect the conflict. How did these traits help or hinder the characters in resolving the conflict?
Key vocabulary (for explicit instruction):

protagonist, antagonist

Vocabulary Strategy: Vocabulary Grid – Description, Example, Visual Cue

Previewing (what, who, when):

Vocabulary Grid: Hero, Villain

Graphic Organizer

How will students store and organize information as they learn during this lesson?
Base the organizer on the Higher Order Thinking or Reading Comprehension in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals.
Determine how the organizer will be previewed for struggling students.
Determine how the organizer will be scaffolded for struggling students.

Compare/Contrast graphic organizer

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Provide examples for comparison criteria

Learning Activity 1

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
Content students need to learn
Chunk activity:

Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
Distributed summarizing and/or practice
Questions to ask
Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
Active engagement:

Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
Variety
Movement
Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
Scaffolding content and process

Review the lesson’s essential question. Explain that many characters’ traits lead them into conflict, and their conflict drives the plot. Read aloud “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.” To help students analyze the effect of the character traits in a story, model a think aloud using a cause organizer and specific examples from the fairytale.

With pairs, ask students to choose and read familiar fairy-tales provided in station bins (Red Riding Hood, and Hansel and Gretel another example on the graphic organizer.

Using Pairs Square, students will discuss how the characters in the fairytale affected the plot and its resolution. Have students to cite specific examples from the fairytale.
Was there a relationship between the character traits and the outcome?
How do you know?

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 1

Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Letter to an Absent Student: Using examples from the fairytales read in class, explain the relationship between a character’s traits and the resolution of conflict in the story.

Learning Activity 2

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
Content students need to learn
Chunk activity:

Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
Distributed summarizing and/or practice
Questions to ask
Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
Active engagement:

Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
Variety
Movement
Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
Scaffolding content and process

Teacher will show a mini video vignette and identify the main characters’ traits. The teacher will model how to analyze characters and their effects on plot by thinking aloud and modeling how to answer the following questions citing specific examples from the vignette and the GO as a guide:

• How do the character’s words reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s thoughts reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s actions reveal the trait?
• How do other people’s responses to the character indicate that he/she has the trait?

In pairs, have students to name their favorite movie characters. Ask them to identify the qualities, or traits, that make the characters memorable and to describe how character’s words, thoughts, actions, and/or interactions affected the outcome or plot of the story. Point out that movies, like literature, feature characters in conflict. Many plots turn on the good guys and bad guys. In some plots, characters cannot be clearly classified as good or evil, but their personality/character traits lead them to conflict, and their conflicts drive or affect the plot. In pairs compare the traits of each character and describe how the traits connect to the outcome of plot and resolution.

Have students to select his/her favorite movie or story that involves a conflict between two strong characters. On the graphic organizer, have students complete the outline of two heads that represent the two main characters. Using the graphic organizer about the protagonist/antagonist, students should focus on:

• How do the character’s words reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s thoughts reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s actions reveal the trait?
• How do other people’s responses to the character indicate that he/she has the trait?

In each of the outlined heads, students will identify 3-5 important character traits. Have students to compare and contrast the two characters and to then complete the Compare/Contrast chart.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Provide a list of common character traits of protagonists and antagonists.

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 2

Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Complete the following sentence below the heads: ___won the conflict because_____. Have students to write one way in which a different character trait might have changed the outcome of the plot and its resolution.

Learning Activity 3

The Learning Goal(s) for this Learning Activity and Assessment Prompt:

Consider:

Explicitly teach Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Strategy (if didn’t in a previous Learning Activity)
Content students need to learn
Chunk activity:

Several opportunities for thinking, talking, writing to learn
Distributed summarizing and/or practice
Questions to ask
Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Questions to ask
Active engagement:

Collaborative Pairs, Numbered Heads, Think-Pair-Share, etc.
Variety
Movement
Previewing prerequisite knowledge/skills
Scaffolding content and process

Have students to independently read the short story selection, “Ta-Na-E-Ka.”

On a piece of paper, have students draw an outline of two heads that represent the two main characters. In each of the outlined heads, students will list 3-5 important character traits. Have students compare the two characters by completing a comparison chart.

Previewing (what, who, when):

Scaffolding (what, who, when):
Provide students an alternative to independently reading the story (ex. partner reading, audio podcast, teacher-led reading)

Assessment Prompt for Learning Activity 3

Formative assessment of the Learning Goal(s).
Ensure the task meets the expectation of the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension Learning Goal.
Remediate: What is an additional learning opportunity for students who did not master the Learning Goal(s) before proceeding?

Two Minute Debate: Pairs will debate which trait had the most significant impact on the plot. Evidence must be detailed and connect clearly to the plot, conflict, and resolution.

Planning Step 2: Lesson Assessment: How will students demonstrate understanding of the Learning Goals for this lesson?

Assignment

Plan this before planning Lesson Instruction.
How will students demonstrate their knowledge of the Will Know Learning Goals and the skills in the Will Be Able To… (Do) Learning Goals (especially the Higher Order Thinking and/or Reading Comprehension)?
How will the Assignment be differentiated for support and challenge?
Which students receive differentiation?
For students who struggle with the Assignment, how will you remediate this lesson?

Using the Compare/Contrast graphic organizer for Ta-Na-E-Ka, students will write a short essay analyzing how Mary’s and Roger’s traits affected the plot by addressing the following questions in the essay:
• How do the character’s words reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s thoughts reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s actions reveal the trait?
• How do other people’s responses to the character indicate that he/she has the trait?

After analyzing the character’s trait, students will justify, citing specific examples from the selection, how such traits affected the plot, as well as how the traits lead to the conflict? Support using detailed evidence from the selection.

Differentiated Assignment for Struggling Students:
Provide students with possible traits and one example of evidence to support the trait. Students must choose the trait to discuss and find additional examples of evidence.

Differentiated Assignment with More Challenge:
Ask students to determine if one trait had more significance than the other. Justify their thinking using detailed evidence of both traits and how each affected the plot, as well as how it led to the conflict.

Remediation:
Students watch a short video clip and analyze it using the Assignment questions:

• How do the character’s words reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s thoughts reveal the trait?
• How do the character’s actions reveal the trait?
• How do other people’s responses to the character indicate that he/she has the trait?

After analyzing the character’s trait, students will justify, citing specific examples from the selection, how such traits affected the plot, as well as how the traits lead to the conflict? Support using detailed evidence from the selection.

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